Rocky Mountain N.P. at Estes Park, Colorado
S. Dakota: Custer, M. Rushmore, and The Badlands.
June 2012



... along the way ...

... picnic at rest area ...... Sunrise at the Great Plains ...


...early morning Moon at the Great Plains ...... Kansas wheat farm with Wind Turbines in background ...


... Manitou Springs (Colorado Springs) area ...

... Manitou Springs ...


... Cold mineral water, bring your own cup at Manitou ...


... Manitou Springs ...


Leaving Colorado Springs.


... Approaching Estes Park area ...








... "Trail Ridge Road" in the Rocky Mountain N.P. ...



... Snow plows were parked approx. every 5 miles apart for possible service.
We saw several driving 30 miles before turning back ...


The tall stick-pole, spaced 50 to 75 feet, play an important role. It marks the edge of the Road
so the snow Plow doesn't go over the edge. There are virtually no Guard Rails to protect you.


... Some drop offs are 2000 feet or more ...










Biological Diversity in the Canyon over that log rail is from mircoorganisms to herds of ELK.














... Young girl is a Junior Ranger ...


... I'll bet your Greatgrandchildren would love to be a Junior Ranger too! ...


... a female Elk taking a break from it all ...



... Next day, driving North through Wyoming to S. Dakota - visited Custer, M. Rushmore and Badlands ...

Sculpture of Chief Crazy Horse in Custer, S. Dakota. General Custer and his soldiers were killed. Most were scalped - no survivors.


... Approaching Mount Rushmore ...






... George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, Abraham Lincoln ...


Mount Rushmore before the project took place.


Mount Rushmore work in progress 1937.



The mountain itself is named after Charles E. Rushmore, a New York lawyer investigating mining
claims in the Black Hills in 1885 and has nothing to do with the sculpture project which came
later.

The project was designed by the sculptor John Gutzon Borglum, March 25, 1871 - March 6, 1941.
The monument was sculpted by Borglum and about 400 stone workers with the construction beginning
on August 10, 1927 (President Coolidge attended the dedication). Funding was provided by private
donations and the Federal Government.

The sculpting was done by first blasting away tons of rock with dynamite. Workers then sat in hanging
"swing seats," and used jackhammers, drills, hammers, and other tools to do the finishing work. Bad
weather and a lack of funding slowed work; although it took 14 years to finish the project, work was
done for only about 6 of those years.

After Borglum's death, soon before the sculpture was done, the completion of the giant sculpture was
overseen by his son, Lincoln Borglum. The monument was completed in 1941 (after Borglum's death).




Badlands are in S. Dakota off of highway I-90.
























Halfway through the tour, noticed a hurricane-like storm coming right at us. About 15 minutes
later it hit us. Winds about 70 mph, Hail, and visibility about 5 - 10 feet. We parked vehicle
with lights and flashers on. Determining this was going to be a lengthy storm, we continued the
the tour as soon as the visibility improved so as to reach I-90 before nightfall. It all worked
out fine for us and found the Badlands to be an amazing part of our Country.



Return to Top of this page

Go Back to Main Page.